Energy Regulatory

Winstead attorneys represent electric and gas utilities, pipelines, and other regulated energy companies, and their customers, in numerous contested cases, rulemaking procedures, and compliance matters  before state and federal energy regulatory agencies.  With decades of experience representing clients before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the Public Utility Commission of Texas and the Railroad Commission of Texas, we have a deep understanding of how to coalesce compliance and regulatory requirements with our energy clients’ business objectives.

Case Study:  Gas Processing and Cogeneration Facility Acquisition

Our client’s mission/issue/opportunity/problem:  In conjunction with its $1 billion acquisition of gas processing, pipeline, and electric cogeneration facilities in the booming Eagle Ford Shale play of Texas, the client needed to rapidly assess the regulatory status of gas processing facilities, gas utility pipelines, and Natural Gas Act Section 311 pipelines, along with the ability to register a cogeneration facility and sell excess electric power from the facility.  In addition, the client also needed to assess the complex status of air permitting at a facility with multiple sources of air emissions.

Winstead approach and solution:  Winstead brought together its team or professionals with extensive experience in the energy and environmental regulations of the Railroad Commission of Texas, the Public Utility Commission of Texas, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, and the Environmental Protection Agency.  Relying on this team approach, the firm delivered timely and accurate legal advice allowing the acquisition to proceed to conclusion.

Outcome:  The client now owns and operates an extraordinarily valuable regulated energy asset that is fully compliant with Texas and federal energy regulations.

Snapshot of Energy Strengths

Because of Winstead’s proven experience in representing clients before energy regulatory agencies, we have formed strong relationships with state and federal regulators, which allow us to quickly obtain the necessary answers for our clients.  Our energy regulatory attorneys routinely help clients evaluate business transactions, perform due diligence, negotiate contracts, provide regulatory agency representation and create comprehensive regulatory litigation strategies.

Our team includes attorneys with experience in a comprehensive range of  energy regulatory matters before the following agencies:

  • Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
  • Texas General Land Office
  • Bureau of Ocean Energy Management and Regulation Enforcement
  • Pipeline Hazardous Material Safety Administration matters
  • Public Utility Commission of Texas
  • Railroad Commission of Texas

Next Steps

Winstead’s energy regulation team includes many attorneys who helped chart the complex roadmaps of the regulations and regulatory agencies. Helping our clients quickly address the necessary regulatory requirements is second nature to us.  Energy clients across the nation make Winstead their first choice to achieve fast, favorable and accurate results for all their energy regulatory needs.

Search Tips:

You may use the wildcard symbol (*) as a root expander.  A search for "anti*" will find not only "anti", but also "anti-trust", "antique", etc.

Entering two terms together in a search field will behave as though an "OR" is being used.  For example, entering "Antique Motorcars" as a Client Name search will find results with either word in the Client Name.

Operators

AND and OR may be used in a search.  Note: they must be capitalized, e.g., "Project AND Finance." 

The + and - sign operators may be used.  The + sign indicates that the term immediately following is required, while the - sign indicates to omit results that contain that term. E.g., "+real -estate" says results must have "real" but not "estate".

To perform an exact phrase search, surround your search phrase with quotation marks.  For example, "Project Finance".

Searches are not case sensitive.

back to top